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#englishgrammar

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An awkward clumsy person can be called a : 1.Clodhopper 2.Bungersome 3.Stumblebum 4.Klutz 5.Bull in a China shop ------------------------------------- Follow @EnglishGyan ✔️❤️
#easyenglish#englishland#englishgrammar#dailyenglish#learnenglish#easygrammar
. 📌Homely 🇺🇸 =plain, unattractive . 📌Homely 🇬🇧 =cozy, comfortable; homey 🏡 . 📌Homily =moral speech; sermon 👴🏼💬⛪ . 📌Homie =(slang) close friend . ⚫⚫⚫ . Follow @EnglishGyan  #learnenglish #englishgyan
Your brain is not a litterbin- Not meant to keep the rubbish.  #lifequotes #life #englishgyan
甥っ子のために教科書の解説を書いてる。 #英語 #英語の勉強 #英文法 #英語学習 #勉強ノート #勉強 #語学 #englishlesson #englishlearning #englishgrammar
Passive voice is a grammatical voice common in many languages. In a clause with passive voice, the grammatical subject expresses the theme or patient of the main verb – that is, the person or thing that undergoes the action or has its state changed.  #englishgrammar #englishlanguage #esl #eslteacher #verbs #phrasalverbs #oxford #ielts  #grammar #adjective #study #english #pronouns #nouns #countable #uncountable #words #vocabulary #loveenglish #englishrules #superlative #ingilizcedersi #prepositions #time #phrasalverbs #confusingwords #learningenglish #dersi #lessons #pronunciation
How to Use Who and Whom in Your Sentences?  Who: Who is in the subjective case and is used as the subject of a verb. Whom: Whom is in the objective case and is used as the direct objective of a verb or as the object of a preposition.  Using Who and Whom in Interrogative Form To properly use who and whom you need to find the verb in the sentence then ask, “ who or what is the subject of the verb?” Consider the example below: (Who/ whom) is your favorite athlete?  In the sentence ‘is’ is the verb and the subject of the verb is “who”. Therefore the correct form of sentence is:  Who is your favorite athlete? (Who/ whom) did you invite to the party? The verb of the sentence is “invite” and the subject of the verb is “you” and “whom” is the object of the verb, therefore the correct sentence is:  Whom did you invite to the party?  How to use Who and Whom as Relative  In order to determine which pronoun to use again look for the verb of the sentence and what is the subject of that verb.  She is the one (who/whom) painted that picture. In the sentence above “panted” is the verb and “who” is the subject of the sentence.  She is the one who painted the picture.  She is the one (who/whom) I love. The verb of the sentence is “love” and the subject of the verb is “I” and “Whom” is the object of the verb.  She is the one whom I love.  Review: If the subject is who or whom, use “ who.” If the subject is not who or whom, use “whom.” #englishgrammar #englishlanguage #esl #eslteacher #verbs #phrasalverbs #oxford #ielts  #grammar #adjective #study #english #pronouns #nouns #countable #uncountable #words #vocabulary #loveenglish #englishrules #superlative #ingilizcedersi #prepositions #time #phrasalverbs #confusingwords #learningenglish #dersi #lessons #pronunciation
ACTIVE / PASSIVE VOICE. Active voice. In most English sentences with an action verb, the subject performs the action denoted by the verb. These examples ... #englishgrammar #englishlanguage #esl #eslteacher #verbs #phrasalverbs #oxford #ielts  #grammar #adjective #study #english #pronouns #nouns #countable #uncountable #words #vocabulary #loveenglish #englishrules #superlative #ingilizcedersi #prepositions #time #phrasalverbs #confusingwords #learningenglish #dersi #lessons #pronunciation
WHERE and WERE are very commonly confused words. Remember that where is an adverb and were is a verb (Were is the past simple form of TO BE for you, we, and they.) These two words are often used together, for example: "Where were you yesterday?"
The Bee's Knees 🐝🐝🐝 Idiom of the day  Means: The highest quality.  From: Let's get down to science! To defeat...the...oh I don't know. Anyway. Bees carry pollen to their hives in sacs that are located on their legs. But bees don't have knees, so the phrase isn't literal in that sense. "A bee's knee" as used in the 18th century referred to smallness, but there's no connection between that phrase and the one that we use now. Instead, that phrase has been replaced with "gnat's bullock". This idiom is relatively new compared to the others; it was used starting in the 20th century in America. It was originally pretty nonsensical, and doesn't really have any deeper meaning. It served, more so, as the butt of a joke and a spoof in a lot of ways, as shown in The West Coast Times, a New Zealand newspaper. A quantity of post holes, 3 bags of treacle and 7 cases of bees' knees was listed as cargo carried by the SS Zealandia. Further, it was used in The Shortstop, a story by Zane Grey from the 1900s. A city-slicker teases a yokel by asking him about imagined farm products. How's yer ham trees? Wal, dog-gone me! Why, over in Indianer our ham trees is sproutin' powerful. An' how about the bee's knees? Got any bee's knees this Spring? The phrase itself is probably only in existence because it rhymes, if we're being honest. Culturally, the 1920s were a time in which nonsense phrases were often used to imply excellence. "The snake's hips", "the kipper's knickers", "the cat's pyjamas/whiskers" and others were also common phrases that pretty much meant the same things. Oddly enough, out of all of the random phrases, the cat's whiskers and the bee's knees are the only ones that truly survived. Go figure. There is one very, very tenuous connection that might put the phrase into a more realistic perspective: it might have referred to Bee Jackson, who was a dancer in the 1920s. She popularized the Charleston, and the phrase might have come from her active knees, but the
Relative clauses.  Relative clauses are clauses starting with the relative pronouns who, that, which, whose, where, when. They are most often used to define or identify the noun that precedes them.  #englishgrammar #englishlanguage #esl #eslteacher #verbs #phrasalverbs #oxford #ielts  #grammar #adjective #study #english #pronouns #nouns #countable #uncountable #words #vocabulary #loveenglish #englishrules #superlative #ingilizcedersi #prepositions #time #phrasalverbs #confusingwords #learningenglish #dersi #lessons #pronunciation
-- 📌People need to know one another to be at their honest best. 📚人們需要相互了解才能達到最誠實的境界。 -- 🐣社團連結👉 http://bit.ly/2xpNf8O 🐣APP下載👉 http://bit.ly/2uEKNgq 🐣一起學英文 ig @dailyenglishtw -- #每日一句學英文 #新多益 #單字力 #背單字 #dailyenglish #english #vocabulary #studyenglish #ielts #toefl #toeic #englishvocabulary #englishlanguage #grammar #englishgrammar #likeforfollow  #follow4like

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